Hygge as a Lifestyle – Part Three

Welcome to the third and final post in my series “Hygge as a Lifestyle.” Let me first reinstate the definition of hygge. Hygge is a Danish word meaning “comfort, warmth, and togetherness.” In Part One of this series, I wrote about the importance of unplugging from technology in order to fully experience the hygge lifestyle. In Part Two, I encouraged my readers to evaluate your environments, wardrobes, and schedules. In my third and final point, I want to focus on the “togetherness” aspect of hygge.

Once you have made your environment comfortable and warm and purposefully set aside times away from technology, it is now time to reconnect.

hygge as a lifestyle


With God

Curling up with a hot drink and a good book sounds attractive. So why not curl up with the Good Book. Spending quiet time reading God’s Word, praying, and journaling is an amazing way of reconnecting with our Creator. Turn on some soulful music, get out one of your favourite journals, and spend some time talking to God. I can’t think of a more comforting, hygge activity. Experiencing “togetherness” with other believers is also extremely important for a healthy, thriving spiritual life. Creating a comfortable “togetherness” with other believers may be easier in a small, informal setting. Hosting a weekly Bible study with just a few people is a great example. This gives you an opportunity to read together and share your thoughts openly on spiritual matters.

reconnect with god
Reconnect with God through Bible reading and journaling

With Yourself

Many people fear being alone. They fear quietness. They are afraid that spending time alone will make them antisocial. While there are definite benefits of spending time with God and others (see points above and below), there is also a great benefit of reconnecting with yourself. That, of course, requires time alone.

I encourage you to sit in silence for a few minutes each day and reflect on your purpose, your dreams, and your personality. Find a comfortable place to curl up and make notes in a colourful notebook. Get to know yourself. Until you fully understand what matters most to you and what makes you “tick” as an individual, you will not be able to properly relate to God or to others.

Once you get to know yourself, you will realize why you respond the way you do in certain situations. You’ll be able to explain to others why certain things are important to you. This will greatly improve your relationships. I also firmly believe that this will strength your relationship with God. God is all about having a personal relationship with each one of us. How one person worships God may not be how someone else needs to worship. While scripture gives us definite lists of things that God likes and doesn’t like, it does not in any way imply a cookie-cutter relationship with God. He created us each uniquely and with unique ways to worship Him. Getting to know yourself will help you discover the best way for you to worship.

With Others

When we think of creating “togetherness,” the first thing that comes to mind is usually our family and close friends.

There are a host of activities that can be enjoyed as a family. This includes playing games, sitting by the campfire, singing, baking, and even working together. Just google “family activities” and you will find a plethora of ideas. Sometimes just sitting and talking can also be enjoyable. Things to talk about can include happy memories, future vacations, or family projects.

reconnect with family
Reconnect with family by playing games together such as yard dominoes

The list is also endless for activities to do with friends. Many people find it enjoyable to craft together (think scrapbooking, sewing, etc) while others enjoy talking about their lives over a cup of coffee.

Find something enjoyable to do with each of your family members and close friends to fully experience the hygge lifestyle.

What are your thoughts on creating a hygge lifestyle? Be sure to share your ideas in the comments.

Until next week, God Bless!


Hygge as a Lifestyle – Part Two

Hygge. That has become one of my favourite words. That’s why I decided to write a series on living a hygge lifestyle. Last week, I briefly defined the word “hygge” and shared my first tip for experiencing a hygge lifestyle. If you missed Part One be sure to read it. I have two more points I want to share, and today I will be writing about my second point.

hygge as a lifestyle

So, my second point is:


Evaluate Your Environment

Look around your living environment. How does the “stuff” there make you feel? Do you feel overwhelmed by the mass amount of your belongings? This might be a good time to do some de-cluttering. Maybe your space doesn’t look comforting to you because it is too empty. Your home is a great place to display your mementos, heirlooms, and all the “stuff” you love.

things I love
I fill my living environment with things I love

You might also want to look at the decorating colours you have chosen. I don’t have the space in this article to discuss colour psychology in depth, but studies have shown that there is a definite link between colours and our moods.¹ If you want to experience hygge, you might want to try decorating with browns, greens, and blues as these colours have proven to be the most peaceful and calming.²

We all know how important comfortable furniture is when you want to relax. So that is another great thing to evaluate in your environment. Make sure that you have at least a couple furniture pieces that call your name.

If there are a lot of people who live in your house, you may want to ensure that each person has their own room/space that they can personalize and where they can relax.

Evaluate Your Wardrobe

Another thing to evaluate when attempting to develop a hygge lifestyle, is your wardrobe. How comfortable are your clothes and shoes? I am definitely writing about physical comfort. It’s hard to have a feeling of hygge if your sweater is irritating your skin or your shoes are too tight. However, I also think that your clothes should also be emotionally comfortable. Do you feel confident in your clothes or do you feel conspicuous? We all have a different style so I am a strong believer that we should not merely attempt to blend in with the crowd. But, I think that most of us know what it is like to wear something that makes us feel self conscious and definitely not hyggly.

clothes you love
Keep only the clothes that you love and feel comfortable wearing

Colour is also important in your wardrobe. I have personally found that the colour I wear, affects how I feel that day (or perhaps how I feel that morning determines the colour I wear!). Evaluate your wardrobe and decide what makes you feel comfortable.

Evaluate Your Schedule

Hygge “activities” (such as curling up on the couch and reading a good book or playing a board game as a family) don’t usually just happen. In our fast-paced modern lives, hygge time is something has to be scheduled into our lives.

Schedule hygge “activities”

Next week, I’ll be sharing my third and final point in the series of “Hygge as a Lifestyle.”

Until then, have a hygge day!


1 You can read this article about colour and behaviour this in the The New York Times.

2 To read more about colour properties be sure to check out this article from Colour Affects.



Hygge as a Lifestyle – Part One

There is a term that has been sweeping the internet for the last couple of years and that term is “hygge.” What is hygge?

Hygge is a Danish word made famous by Meik Wiking in his book “The Little Book of Hygge: the Danish Way to Live Well.” He describes hygge as meaning comfort, warmth, and togetherness. It is about finding happiness and comfort in the simple everyday things of life. When I first heard this word and its meaning, I was over-the-top excited. It described the exact lifestyle I have been trying to live. Now I have an actual word to describe it!

That is why I am super excited to share with you my ideas on how to create a hygge lifestyle. I will be sharing these ideas over the next three weeks so be sure to stay tuned for the next two articles on this topic.

My first tip is in many ways the most important, but yet the most difficult. Here it is:


So much of our lives seem to be controlled by technology. We use it for work, and we use it for play. While no one can refute that technology can be very useful, studies have shown that technology has a major negative impact on our brain health. The Guardian published an article called Why the Modern World is Bad for Your Brain, in which neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin states the following:

“Our brains are busier than ever before. We’re assaulted with facts, pseudo facts, jibber-jabber, and rumour, all posing as information. Trying to figure out what you need to know and what you can ignore is exhausting. At the same time, we are all doing more. Thirty years ago, travel agents made our airline and rail reservations, salespeople helped us find what we were looking for in shops, and professional typists or secretaries helped busy people with their correspondence. Now we do most of those things ourselves. We are doing the jobs of 10 different people while still trying to keep up with our lives, our children and parents, our friends, our careers, our hobbies, and our favourite TV shows.

…Our smartphones have become Swiss army knife–like appliances that include a dictionary, calculator, web browser, email, Game Boy, appointment calendar, voice recorder, guitar tuner, weather forecaster, GPS, texter, tweeter, Facebookupdater, and flashlight.

….Even though we think we’re getting a lot done, ironically, multitasking makes us demonstrably less efficient. Multitasking has been found to increase the production of the stress hormone cortisol as well as the fight-or-flight hormone adrenaline, which can overstimulate your brain and cause mental fog or scrambled thinking. Multitasking creates a dopamine-addiction feedback loop, effectively rewarding the brain for losing focus and for constantly searching for external stimulation.”

That sounds exactly the opposite of hygge. So if you want to experience a hygge lifestyle, you must deliberately unplug during times when the use of technology is not absolutely required. This could include reading printed paper books, writing in an actual notebook, or playing old-fashioned type games. Maybe it’s time to go back to Grandma’s crossword puzzles, Dad’s paper-backed dictionary, or Mom’s pocket planner.

Unplugging is an important step in achieving a hygge lifestyle

Unplugging is also vital in reconnecting with others. As mentioned at the beginning of this article, the definition of hygge includes “togetherness.” It is difficult to experience “togetherness” when each individual is swallowed up in their own phone. Though called “social” media, this modern phenomena is anything but social. Real socializing begins when the phones are put down and the computer and TV are shut off. Then we can take time to re-connect in a real, not virtual, environment.

I encourage you this weekend to unplug and experience a little bit of hyyge.

Until next week, have a hygge life!


Recovering the Magic of Christmas

There is something magical about Christmas to a child. The lights, the secrets, the treats. Magic that seems to disappear as time goes by and the responsibilities of adulthood take over. For many adults, Christmas can be the most stressful time of the year. How sad! What can be done to prevent this from happening? What can be done to recreate a magical and memorable Christmas? Read on for some tips and ideas.

Set Priorities

Ask yourself the following question: What do I want to remember about this Christmas? If you have spouse and children, you might also want to ask them the same question. For every person, the answer might be a little different, but choose what matters most for each family member.

Next, sit down and make a holiday schedule. Make one for the whole month of December, one for each week, and/or one for each day. Take a serious look at all the events and responsibilities of the season and see how each thing fits with your priorities. Will this event help you remember what you want to remember about this Christmas?

Once you’ve determined what events, etc. match your priorities, don’t be afraid to say “no” to the other things. If you say “yes” to everything, you won’t have time to truly enjoy the things that are important to you. You’ll also feel a lot of pressure and stress – exactly what we are trying to avoid. Remember, too, it isn’t being selfish to say “no.” If you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t be able to help others (including your own family).

Keep it Simple

This point follows closely with the last point, but here I want to cover more of the smaller details of the season. If my readers are are anything like me, you might be striving to have a “perfect” Christmas. I want a perfectly decked tree, a perfectly spread tablescape, and perfectly wrapped gifts. There is a big problem with that, however, since I can spend my whole Christmas season working and fretting over everything I do. When the holiday as passed, most people are not going to remember those things. What people will remember is the interactions between family members and friends (whether strained or pleasant) and the mood of the atmosphere (whether happy or sad). Choose to enjoy the moment rather than on fretting about everything being perfect.

Schedule Quiet Times

This point also ties in with setting priorities.  Make sure to schedule a few times throughout the month, where you can turn the noise off, sit quietly, and reflect on this season. During this time, you might sit on the floor and admire the lighted Christmas tree. You might lie on the couch and read Luke’s version of the Christmas story. You might stand perfectly still in the falling snow and catch snowflakes with your tongue. Whatever, you choose to do, be quiet and only think pleasant Christmas thoughts.

So, what do you want to remember about this Christmas? Whatever your answer might be, I wish you a very Merry and Magical Christmas!


5 Tips to Beat Anxiety

In this week’s post, I am changing directions a little. As someone who has suffered with intense anxiety throughout most of my life, I decided to share how I have learned to deal with it. Anxiety to some degree is entirely normal. Most of us feel anxiety before tests, certain events, or during major life changes. These tips that I am sharing will certainly help during those times. However, I am sharing these tips for those of us who feel anxiety even over the everyday routines of life.

If you find your anxiety interfering with your ability to function please make an appointment to see your doctor. I also encourage you to find a qualified counsellor/therapist who can provide a listening ear as well as generate a specific plan of action for you. I have found both of these disciplines to be extremely helpful in this area of my life.

I also have developed some of my own coping mechanisms, and I felt like maybe these would be helpful to someone else. So here are my tips:

1. Take 5. If you are feeling overwhelmed in your present environment, leave the room and take a few minutes. At work or in social settings, I have at times excused myself to the bathroom where I decompress and take deep breaths. You’ll be amazed at how well this actually works!

2. Get the right amount of sleep. This can be difficult for people who tend to have insomnia during times of high anxiety. It can be tough to shut your mind down long enough to sleep. I occasionally struggle with this. One way I deal with that is to reflect on the things that make me happy. Of course, my thoughts will stray, but I usually can bring myself back to focus. If it takes a long time for me to go to sleep or I wake up in the night and am unable to go back to sleep, I find changing environments helpful. That means moving to the couch or a spare bed. What I most often struggle with, however, is sleeping too much when I am feeling anxious. While it is helpful to get rest, sleeping too much can actually lead from anxiety into depression. In order to combat this, I try to make a plan for each day of things I want to accomplish. That way when I get up in the morning, instead of going back to bed, I focus on my goals. I will sometimes take naps in the afternoon, but I will set my alarm for 30 minutes in order to not take too long of a nap. When the alarm goes off, I get up and have something to eat. This helps give me energy and return to working on my to-do list. I will admit that I still don’t have this process down pat, but I am continuing to work on it!

3. Get outside. Fresh air and exercise are both great medicines in dealing with anxiety even if it is just a short walk. I also find that sitting outside while reading or journaling effective. Even more so, working in the dirt is especially beneficial. Studies have proven that a bacterium called Mycobacterium vaccae in soil increases the brain chemical of serotonin and acts like an antidepressant. (https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/66840.php)

4. Have a down time. In our fast-paced society, having a time to relax and do something enjoyable is essential. Finding this time can be difficult for some people especially those with kids, but it needs to be a priority since it is needed to lower stress and thus lower your stress hormone – cortisol. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress/art-20046037 Setting aside time each day to read, journal, craft, cook, or do what is enjoyable to you helps keep your anxiety intact and your cortisol balanced. Sit down right now and make a plan of how you will accomplish this.

5. Recite Scripture. I have found my relationship with God most helpful in dealing with my anxiety. There is a lot of great promises and encouraging scriptures found in God’s Word. If you memorize a few of these, they will come back to your memory just when you need them. One of my favourite verses is “The angel of the Lord encamps around those who fear (reverence) him, and he delivers them.” Psalm 34:7

I hope this tips have been helpful to you. Be sure to sure your tips in the comments below.

Happy Fall!